Tuesday, August 5, 2008

RUNNING TWICE A DAY

Who does it and what is the benefit? Curious that's all. Plus, I think its an interesting topic for discussion. Since some of the folks on the team work like mad to improve, stay strong, etc. it might be interesting to hear the rationale behind your training methods. Please someone reveal, unless, of course, these matters are top secret.

On a personal note I went running with some cats on the Glover Archibald trail this eve. Soon we will have to start wearing headlamps out there as it was getting dark by the end of the run. We hammered as there was some national class Italian Steeple Chase guy along for the ride who just killed us.

Legs are now jello.

15 comments:

Peter said...

I am now running 13 times per week, 2 runs per day except for the Sunday long run. I find it is mentally and physically easier to log big mileage (above 70 mpw) this way as opposed to running singles. I also find it boosts the metabolism and makes recovery easier (though that may seem a bit counterintuitive as you have 12 hours or less between runs as opposed to 24). There is science behind this but I was to lazy to go get Daniels' Running Formula off of my bookshelf.

KLIM said...

A great man (and former AR holder) once told me simply "you should run as much as you're capable of running" and that "twice a day is better than once a day" (not verbatim)

Of course, all bodies are different and some can't handle doubles as well as others. I typically ONLY double as I hit peak mileage (95 for me) pre-big race. My shins are like peanut brittle and typically buckle under the two-a-days.

That being said, coincidentally, today I ran my first double as I am trying to get my mileage up.

Geir said...

Max, the topic is both relevant and interesting, and from your recent postings on this blog combined with the few discussions we have had I interpret it that way that you are interesting in the how and why of training, I would recommend you to read some training literature, philosophy and methodology. I have seen that the GRC have some good books in the store, but if you want some recommendations I am more than glad to come up with some titles for you. Either you chose Bowerman, Lydiard, Bideau, Coe or Daniels (to namedrop a few), I do think they all will give you answers that are not only understandable, but also show you that there are no silver bullet when it comes to training, but there is, an understanding of a common base.

MAX said...

These are interesting comments. I must admit that historically, I have not been a methodology man and thus, my training has been sporadic and inconsistent over the years. As Jake points out, everybody is uniique and their bodies hold up differently to levels of wear and tear.

Personally, I have only run twice a day on trails and soft surfaces.

The pavement kills seems to take more energy from my legs and the pounding takes it toll.

Recently, I have been following some of the teachings of Sean Wade, one of the best Master's runners in the world. He has this website called the Kenyan Way, which is pretty interesting.

http://www.kenyanway.com

PR said...

Peter's right to note that there is science behind the benefits of running twice a day. Noakes "Lore of Running" goes into a fair amount of detail on the subject.

The non-scientific answer for why I run twice a day is that 95% of the fastest runners in the world run twice a day. Like long runs, speed work, or threshold runs, doubles are just another tried-and-true piece of the puzzle.

Peter said...

Max, it is good to seek out soft surfaces for as much of your running as possible, especially as your body ages.

Patrick, I didn't think anyone else was a big enough running geek to have read Noakes' massively long "Lore of Running" but apparently I was wrong. That is a great book.

KLIM said...

That book sits unopened under a pile of toiletries in my bathroom back in Massachusetts. And I'll be damned if it leaves that spot!

PR said...

Mine sits opened, in my bathroom, next to the toiletries. But I haven't even come close to reading it all...damn it if it leaves *that* spot.

It's a cinder block-sized distance running textbook. "Anna Kerenina" is a weekend beach read compared to Noakes.

MAX said...

Peter, I am the only one allowed to comment about my aging body

Joe said...

I started running two-a-days a few years ago. My times dropped dramatically as soon as I started. For me, I feel stronger if I run 90 minutes as a 60 and a 30 than if I do a 90. I recover faster and I've also found that my metabolism is boosted. I don't follow any strict schedule though. My office has a shower, so I run as my commute and it is easy to tack on to make one run longer. I started doing it because I thought that I would benefit by being on my feet more times per day since I spend most of it sitting behind a desk.

Peter said...

Max, my apologies if I offended you.

Jake, skip all Noakes' V02, hemoglobin, lactate stuff and read the history section. He goes into great detail about the training of Nurmi, Zatopek and more. If you're a runner and a history buff, it is fascinating.

KLIM said...

Coincidentally, i will be in that bathroom on Saturday morning...so I'll give the history part a read.

JARRIN said...

Max - I am old enough to comment about your age so I will: deal with it and stop feeling sorry for yourself because nobody else does.

MAX said...

I have to bring up the age thing because it puts everything in perspective. its not about feeling sorry for ones-self. I have enjoyed every moment of life. However, I do miss my young legs. The juice and energy just go as you move along on the journey and youthful energy is simply what it is. My advice to the youth is to not take it for granted. Also, anyone who takes my comments about age seriously does not know me at all.

Dane said...

Even though my life is quite hectic right now, I am beginning to be a twice a man day myself. It just feels good.

I think it was CS Lewis who said :"f one could run without getting tired I don't think one would often want to do anything else"